The London Garden Society Award 2018

We are pleased to announce that ACertificate awardrundel & Ladbroke Gardens was awarded a Certificate of Excellence from The London Squares Garden Competition 2018, in the category of Small Private Gardens Squares.

The London Gardens Society is a registered charity that has been established for over 100 years and its aim is “to make a permanent contribution towards beautifying London by the growing of flowers and shrubs thus improving the urban environment”.

With thanks and congratulation to Susan Lynn and the tireless work of our gardening team lead by Paul Walsh, who keep our gardens looking at their best all the year round.

 

Gardens & Boundaries

There are many garden squares in the Royal Borough with beautiful houses backing onto the communal gardens, but not all have the privilege of their own private garden within the larger park.

So we are extremely lucky that each house backing onto the Arundel and Ladbroke Communal Gardens has its own private garden, which belongs to and is the sole responsibility of the residents of the house.

Traditionally the private rear gardens were bounded with the low wrought iron railings, many of which have been lost or replaced with walls, trellis, hedges or high planting.

The Ladbroke Conservation Area Appraisal (RBK&C 2015) documents the historical design of the houses and gardens in our area and how they have changed over the years, the document issues some guidelines to residents to encourage the reinstatement and preservation of the historic nature of the gardens.

We hope that residents will consider these guidelines when designing their own gardens and boundary fences within our communal garden square and attempt to maintain the overall character mentioned in the appraisal.

The full document can be downloaded from the RBK&C website link:

Ladbroke Conservation Area Appraisal 2015

The following are the relevant excerpts from the document pertaining to our communal gardens:

“2.29 The backdrop of the gardens is provided by the rear elevations of the houses that surround them which are often as finely detailed as the frontages. In most of the communal gardens, the houses have their own private garden area, separated from each other and from the communal garden with cast iron railings or bottle balustrades. A good number of original railings survive and make an important contribution to the character of the conservation area in themselves and by allowing the private and communal gardens to merge in an open and leafy manner. Each garden has its own uniform pattern of railings or balustrades, and where these are missing or have been replaced by walls or fences, the character of the area would be enhanced by their reinstatement.”

“2.30 Unfortunately, some private rear gardens,
and their boundaries fronting the communal gardens, have suffered from visually insensitive and historically inappropriate alterations or additions. The private gardens are generally low-key with natural stone paving, low railings, and carefully managed planting to give some privacy, while maintaining the visual amenity of the ensemble that they make with the communal gardens. Light pollution from over-large windows or glass extensions can also be an issue in these valuable dark spaces.”

“3.73 The private back gardens leading onto the communal gardens often have similar planting which merges with that of the communal garden across their railings (where these remain). Private gardens therefore contribute to the haven of nature and peace of these special areas.”

“3.74 Traditionally the private gardens were separated from the communal garden by railings (sometimes mounted on low plinths and usually matching along that side of the garden) or in some cases bottle balustrades. This gives the same appearance as a front garden fronted with railings, or a parkland enclosure, and allows the greenery in the private gardens to be seen.”

“3.77 Some back gardens have seen the loss of greenery to modernisation including hard surfaces for patios, enlarged lightwells or the construction of intrusive structures including solid fences to the boundaries. This harm to the area’s verdant character is compounded where it can easily be seen from the communal gardens or neighbouring windows. Restoration of railings or bottle balustrades on the other hand can enhance the setting of the communal garden.”

NGS – Open Day

National Garden Scheme

May 20 @ 13:30 pm – 18:00 pm

Over more than eighty years the NGS has established an unrivalled reputation as the organiser of outstanding gardens being opened to visitors in order to raise funds for the charity which has proved to be a great success.

Our Gardens are at their best at this time of year and we were very proud to be invited to participate in this scheme again.

Refreshments stall selling teas and homemade cakes.

If any of the residents would like to contribute cakes for the stall we would be most grateful. Similarly, if anyone would like to help out for a short time on the day, maybe on the cake stall or at the gate you will be welcomed with open arms! Please contact any one of the committee members or email us: info@arundelladbbrokegardens.co.uk

Shakespeare Performance – As You Like It

June 26 @ 7:00 pm –  (approx) 10:00 pm

SHAKESPEARE IN THE SQUARES ANNOUNCES 2018 PRODUCTION OF

As You Like It

By William Shakespeare

Directed by Tatty Hennessy

Tour: 20 June – 13 July

Press night: 26 June 7pm, Arundel and Ladbroke Gardens, W11

Shakespeare in the Squares announces its 2018 production of As You Like It, directed by Tatty Hennessy, which tours to London’s squares and parks from 20 June to 13 July, with a press night at Arundel and Ladbroke Gardens on 26 June. Opening up London’s glorious private squares and gardens to magical performances for Londoners and family audiences, Shakespeare in the Squares’ third production follows the company’s successful productions of Much Ado About Nothing in summer 2016 and Romeo and Juliet in summer 2017, which were performed to sell-out audiences. The tour of As You Like It will visit twice as many locations as the inaugural Shakespeare in the Squares tour in 2016.

Download Press Release Here

Tickets will be available 27th April 2018

More information will be posted on our website, on the Shakespeare-in-the-Squares website and emailed out to residents in early April.

 

Dog Owners

FOR THE ATTENTION OF ALL DOG OWNERS AND DOG WALKERS

JANUARY 2017

PLEASE REFRESH YOURSELVES WITH YOUR GARDEN COMMITTEE’S RULES FOR DOGS IN OUR GARDEN.

WE HAVE TWENTY DOGS TO SHARE THE GARDEN SQUARE WITH. THE DOG BINS GET EMPTIED TWICE A WEEK. IF FULL PLEASE TAKE YOUR BAGS HOME.

RULES:

  • THE GARDEN SQUARE IS NOT FOR EXERCISING DOGS.
  • DOGS ARE TO BE ON THE LEAD DURING THESE TIMES, 10AM – 4PM , ESPECIALLY DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS WHEN RESIDENTS ARE HAVING PICNICS AND SITTING ON THE LAWNS.
  • PLEASE TAKE CARE THAT YOUR DOGS DO NOT RUN INTO THE FLOWER BEDS, PRIVATE GARDENS & PLAY AREA.  ESPECIALLY WHEN THROWING BALLS FOR THEM.
  • VISITORS’ DOGS ARE WELCOMED BUT MUST BE ON LEADS AT ALL TIMES.
  • PLEASE BE GOOD SPIRITED IN PICKING UP OTHER DOG FAECES, ESPECIALLY THOSE THAT HAVE BEEN MISSED. THIS MATTER NEEDS TO BE KEPT UNDER CONTROL.

ANY QUERIES REGARDING DOG MATTERS CONTACT SUZANNE  PRESS  020 7792 2452   paperpress7@gmail.com

1953 – Kensington Improvement Act

arundel1952When the Council is finally asked to take over the gardens, the secretary had to get the consent of all the freeholders and leaseholders. To help with this exhausting task, he was supplied with a list of ratepayers and rated occupiers, which can also be compared with the Electoral Register.

Although there were resident freeholders or leaseholders in eleven of the 47 houses, only two in Arundel Gardens and two in Ladbroke Gardens, were occupied by one family or one person. The rest were rooming houses that may well have housed more than the seven to nine people recorded in the Electoral Register.

The photo of houses in Arundel Gardens from 1952 shows how grim the houses looked then.

In 1953 a desperate Mr Greene, the secretary, got an agreement to adopt the Kensington Improvement Act of 1851. This means that the rents, hitherto paid to the Trustees, become rates collected by the council and repaid to the committee as now.

March 1953, the Housing and Town Planning Committee reported that “under the Kensington Improvement Act of 1851, the Metropolis Management Act of 1855 and the London Government Act of 1899, the Royal Borough of Kensington do as from the first day of April 1953, take under their control and management the garden square known as Arundel & Ladbroke Garden Enclosure”

1952 – The Postwar Years

ladbroke1952The war and the trench shelter were the “coup de grace” for the concept of an “ornamental pleasure ground” the shelter had destroyed the east end of the garden.

The compensation paid by the council was not enough to restore it to an “ornamental” condition. A photograph taken by a woman who lived in the second floor bedsit of 25 Arundel Gardens in 1952 shows jungle taking over. Worst of all, intruders have no difficulty in entering.

“It was slummy, full of studenty types like me. I never went in the garden, but I loved the big plane tree I could see from my window. Inside the house was dark with dirty paintwork. I don’t remember a bathroom. My room had a gas ring and a basin. I wasn’t there much. The landlady insisted on opening the front door to make sure no unauthorised men were getting in”.

 

1940 – Bombed

On 26 th September, 1940, between 1 and 1.15 am a incendiary bomb fell in the garden somewhere near 2 – 4 Ladbroke Gardens. Unfortunately, the bomb incident map is on too small a scale to locate the exact spot. No casualties and no damage were reported. We are luckier than some others in nearby streets

On 5th March 1943 Trench Site no.13 is officially closed.

1939 – The Trench Site no 13

trenchzoomInside the shelter the four W.C.s are latrines, with two buckets apiece. According to the Local War Instructions of 28 th July, 1939, the shelter is to be supplied with eight hurricane lamps with four spare and one barrel of paraffin. Provision is similar in the other squares, but Kensington Gardens shelter gets 96 latrine buckets. Nothing is said about emptying the buckets.

It is ready to shelter people by 31 st October, 1939, nearly two months since war has been declared, but in time for the Blitz which comes to North Kensington in September, 1940. These shelters are only for people caught on the streets during an air raid, not for the residents, who are supposed to use their basements.

Other public shelters nearby are a public surface shelter at 14 Arundel Gardens, and public basement shelters at 92 Ladbroke Grove, 138 Portobello Rd and 2a Stanley Crescent. The nearest A.R.P. Warden and First Aid Post is on the corner of Elgin Crescent and Ladbroke Grove.